The Quicksilver (comics) reference article from the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004
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Quicksilver (comics)

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Quicksilver (Pietro Maximoff) is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe, a hot-headed, arrogant mutant with superhuman speed and reflexes. Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, he first appeared in X-Men #4 (1962).

Quicksilver is the brother of the Scarlet Witch and the son of Magneto, although this latter fact was not known for many years. The siblings were initially supervillain members of Magneto's Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, but they soon reformed and joined The Avengers. He was married to Crystal of the Inhumans and the pair had a daughter, Luna. The pair have had a rocky marriage, culminating in an affair on her part which led her to turn his back on his family and teammates. During this protracted period of estrangement, she became romantically involved with the Black Knight, while he joined the government-sponsored mutant team, X-Factor. The pair were eventually reunited, though their relationship remains stormy. In 1997, Quicksilver recieved his own ongoing series; it sold poorly, and was cancelled after a year.

Quicksilver possesses the superhuman ability to run, think and react at great speed; he has often claimed that the rest of the world seems to move, and think, in slow motion. He is able to run up vertical surfaces and across water, and can even fly for short distances by moving quickly to form a miniature tornado. In this regard, he is Marvel's counterpart to DC Comics' The Flash. Unlike the Flash, Quicksilver's speed is relatively limited; originally, he had difficulty breaking the sound barrier, though during his short-lived series his speed was drastically increased.

Interstingly, DC Comics themselves had a super-speedster named Quicksilver in the Golden Age of comic books; when he was revived in the pages of The Flash, he was renamed Max Mercury to avoid trademark confusion with Marvel's then-long-established character.