The Music of Tennessee reference article from the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004
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Music of Tennessee

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Music of the United States
History (Timeline and Samples)
Before 1940: Synthesis of Sources
1940s and 50s: Invention of Popular Music
1960s and 70s: Creation of a Counterculture
1980s to the present: Diversification of Styles
Ethnicities
African American
Native American music (Inuit music>Inuit and Hawaiian)
Latin (Tejano and Puerto Rican)
Other immigrants (Jewish, European, South and East Asian, modern African, Middle-Eastern and Cajun and Creole)
Local music
AL - AK - AR - CA - CO - CT - DC - DE - FL - GA - GU - HI - ID - IL - IN - IA - KS - KY - LA - ME - MD - MA - MI - MN - MP - MS - MO - MT - NC - ND - NE - NV - NH - NJ - NM - NY - OH - OK - OR - PA - PR - RI - SC - SD - TN - TX - UT - VT - VA - VI - WA - WV - WI - WY

Tennessee's most famous contribution to American culture is surely the status of Nashville as the long-time capital of country music. By the 1950s, the city's record labels dominated the genre with slick pop-country (Nashville sound). Performers reacting against the Nashville sound formed their own scenes in Lubbock, Texas and Bakersfield, California, the latter of which (Bakersfield sound) became the most popular type of country by the late 1960s, led by Merle Haggard. Nashville's primacy in county music was regained by the early 1980s, when Dwight Yoakam and other neo-traditionalists entered the charts.

Punk rock

Punk rock was never strongly embraced in Tennessee, a highly conservative state. A few hardcore punk bands gained a following, including Committee for Public Safety (Nashville) and STD (Knoxville).

References

Blush, Steven. American Hardcore: A Tribal History. Feral House. 2001. ISBN 0-922915-717-7