The Music of Oregon reference article from the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004
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Music of Oregon

Spread the word about a children's charity with social media
Music of the United States
History (Timeline and Samples)
Before 1940: Synthesis of Sources
1940s and 50s: Invention of Popular Music
1960s and 70s: Creation of a Counterculture
1980s to the present: Diversification of Styles
Ethnicities
African American
Native American music (Inuit music>Inuit and Hawaiian)
Latin (Tejano and Puerto Rican)
Other immigrants (Jewish, European, South and East Asian, modern African, Middle-Eastern and Cajun and Creole)
Local music
AL - AK - AR - CA - CO - CT - DC - DE - FL - GA - GU - HI - ID - IL - IN - IA - KS - KY - LA - ME - MD - MA - MI - MN - MP - MS - MO - MT - NC - ND - NE - NV - NH - NJ - NM - NY - OH - OK - OR - PA - PR - RI - SC - SD - TN - TX - UT - VT - VA - VI - WA - WV - WI - WY

Oregon's musical contributions to American culture is centered around Portland, a center of hardcore punk and disco music, among other genres.

Table of contents
1 Early Rock and Roll
2 Punk rock
3 References

Early Rock and Roll

The Kingsmen, best known for their oldies rock classic "Louie Louie", were originally from Portland, Oregon.

Punk rock

Portland had one of the most vibrant hardcore punk scenes in the early 1980s Pacific Northwest, rivalled only by Seattle and Vancouver. The Wipers and Poison Idea are the best known representatives of the scene, especially The Wipers, a major grunge influence. These bands played at The Met and The Satyricon, and were connected with cult comedian Bill Hicks. Other hardcore bands included Lockjaw, Final Warning, The Rats and Sado Nation.

References

Blush, Steven. American Hardcore: A Tribal History. Feral House. 2001. ISBN 0-922915-717-7