The Music of North Carolina reference article from the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004
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Music of North Carolina

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Music of the United States
History (Timeline and Samples)
Before 1940: Synthesis of Sources
1940s and 50s: Invention of Popular Music
1960s and 70s: Creation of a Counterculture
1980s to the present: Diversification of Styles
Ethnicities
African American
Native American music (Inuit music>Inuit and Hawaiian)
Latin (Tejano and Puerto Rican)
Other immigrants (Jewish, European, South and East Asian, modern African, Middle-Eastern and Cajun and Creole)
Local music
AL - AK - AR - CA - CO - CT - DC - DE - FL - GA - GU - HI - ID - IL - IN - IA - KS - KY - LA - ME - MD - MA - MI - MN - MP - MS - MO - MT - NC - ND - NE - NV - NH - NJ - NM - NY - OH - OK - OR - PA - PR - RI - SC - SD - TN - TX - UT - VT - VA - VI - WA - WV - WI - WY

Most influentially, North Carolina country musicians like the North Carolina Ramblers helped solidify the sound of country in the late 1920s.

Punk rock

Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill was a regional center for punk rock, due to its large number of college students. The most famous was Corrosion of Conformity, who followed in the footsteps of area pioneers Th' Cigaretz. Later hardcore punk bands included No Labels, Colcor, Stillborn Christians and Oral Fixation.

References

Blush, Steven. American Hardcore: A Tribal History. Feral House. 2001. ISBN 0-922915-717-7